Saturday, July 20, 2019

Wall Street Journal reports on employers spying on workers; and for chefs, hand appearances matter


Sarah Krouse has a big article in the “Exchange” section of this weekend’s Wall Street Journal (July 20, 2019), “The new ways your boss is spying on you”.

A lot of the article deals with movement monitoring for jobs like waiters, but some of it applies to desk workers too.  One of the packages discussed is comes from Ambit Analytics.

  
The article also advises against “bring your own gear” and suggests separation between personal and work-related hardware, even phones. It is also taking the position that most people need to be sparing about the way they use social media (although I’ve talked a lot about that before, as I made a career of it early in the game).

The Russia Today video above misspelled "employees".  
  
Nick Kostov has a whimsical piece about the importance of the appearance of chef’s hands on food videos. 

Monday, July 15, 2019

Walmart uses an Oculus Go virtual reality system to screen, train associates



Peter Holley describes a new kind of interview tool for companies putting people into regimented retail jobs, at least for promotions, on p. A21 of the Washington Post Monday July 15, 2019. 


That is an Oculus Go virtual reality headset, through which applicants will be tested to see how well they can perform tasks and how quickly when confronted by practical situations that happen suddenly in a retail store.
  
In March 2004, I had interviewed for a retail job at Hollywood Video before I started substitute teaching.  I guess I was overqualified (“IYI”).

Monday, July 08, 2019

YouTuber loses job because of his videos supposedly connecting him to Pewdiepie


A YouTuber named Isaiah Photo relates how he lost his job (or a major client) because of his “fun” videos making fun of (or with) Pewdiepie.


At about 3:40 he reports that a client said it didn’t want to work with someone “associated” with Pewdiepie, who was perceived as a “racist” or “anti-Semitic”.  That is certainly false objectively, but Wikipedia gives a little bit of an idea why some people have this impression (see a couple of sentences under "Media Controversies").

Later in the video Isaiah talks about the possibility that the Christchurch attack aggravated the situation, which might not have otherwise happened.

Seriously, there have been deplatformings (as by Patreon) against persons merely because of their perceived "associations" with other groups or persons thought to be connected to white supremacy or neo-Nazism, but nearly always these supposed connections (with a very few exceptions) are false. Very few high profile speakers in the US, UK. etc. actually advocate ethno states. And Donald Trump does not.

There is a problem of  "dumbing down" as companies have to deal with the gullibility of a rather illiterate public in understanding social media. 
    
I’ve talked about my own issues with “conflict of interest” in my own self-publishing and the workplace (esp. Feb. 4, 2014).  

Wednesday, July 03, 2019

Apple moves its assembly of its top-line Mac Pro to China, maybe risking tariffs?


Apple seems to be defying Trump’s tariff actions and threats by announcing it will move final assembly of the Mac Pro to China, from Austin, TX, as in this Ars Technica story by Jon Brodkin. 

The new desktop would cost around $6000, but theoretically tariffs could raise the price to $8000.  This possibility doesn’t seem to be explained.  We’re left with Trump’s senior moment, calling the Apple CEO “Tim Apple”.   This product is said to be low in volume compared to the smaller computers. 

  
I will replace my Apple MacBook (2015) with a new unit by the fall, in order to complete my music projects and bring them into performable shape. My own investigation seems to show that the Sibelius Ultimate product would need an Apple unit that costs around $2300 or so (and apparently no tariff).  But I’ll look to see what ThioJoe has to say about this.