Thursday, March 08, 2018

"Scrubber" and "Rep'n Up" will clean up your social media posts before job interviews

WJLA-7 in Washington has reported on a couple of startup products that can clean up social media posts and therefore “online reputation” before job interviews.

One of these is “Scrubber”.  Note that it says political and religious posts are fine with them, but they’ll scrub them if asked to.  The problem is political or religious creates a real issue for people with direct reports or underwriting responsibilities in the workplace.

The other is Rep’n Up.  DCinno and the Boston Globe have detailed stories.
It’s important to remember that when people are not allowed so speak about political (or religious) matters for themselves, organizations develop more power and pull to demand “solidarity” from others and to recruit people into their “tribes”.  I’ll take this up in more detail again on Wordpress. 

Sunday, March 04, 2018

Tattoos in the workplace

Should employees get corporate tattoos?  Should they be expected to?  Allowed to?
A story in the Wall Street Journal by Rachel Feintzel and Kelsey Gee examines the issue at places like WalMart, Anytime Fitness, US Forest Service, and more. Sailors have long used tattoos to mark places they have been (like crossing the Equator).
Workplace tattoos seem like a way to “join the tribe”.  That would fit into the ideas o Amy Chua’s book.
But body art might violate the idea of body sanctity in my style of thinking.

Picture: A DC restaurant appears to refer to the transgender character "Pie O Pah" in Clive Barker's Imajica ("Pie Oh My").